Project Description

Everyone knows durian. However, many may not have heard of Durio griffithii or durian tupai, another member of the Malvaceae (Durian family) which  is now flowering and fruiting in Non-Dipterocarp Arboretum. Other than Peninsular Malaysia, this species can also be found in Peninsular Thailand, Sumatra and Borneo. The fruit is small up to 7.5 cm long. When ripe and still attached to the tree, the fruit will split advertising its long, black seeds with a little orange fleshy “arils”, to mammals and birds. Usually, squirrels eat the seeds from the fruit before it ripen. This species is a medium size tree up to 30 m tall with smooth bark. Known habitats include lowland mixed dipterocarp forests. The bark are sometimes used for tanning. The timber although not durable has been used for home and ship building.

Durio griffithii can be seen fruiting at the Non-dipterocarp arboretum.

Durio griffithii can be seen fruiting at the Non-dipterocarp arboretum.

The attractive colour of the seed and aril invites animals to consume and subsequently disperse the seeds.

The attractive colour of the seed and aril invites animals to consume and subsequently disperse the seeds.

Durio griffithii's flowers

Durio griffithii‘s flowers