Forest Biodiversity

>>>Forest Biodiversity
Forest Biodiversity 2018-05-31T15:24:36+00:00

Contact Person: Richard Chung Cheng Kong (Dr.)
Tel: 03-6279 7231
E-mail:FRIM_biodiversity[at]frim.gov.my
For more details click Brochure

Contact Person: Ong Su Ping
Tel: 03-6279 7717
E-mail: FRIM_biodiversity[at]frim.gov.my
For more details click Brochure

Contact Person: Mohd Farid Ahmad (Dr.)
Tel: 03-6279 7119
E-mail: FRIM_biodiversity[at]frim.gov.my
For more details click Brochure

 

  • Flora Biodiversity
  • Fauna Biodiversity
  • Forest Health and Conservation

Historical Background

The herbarium of Forest Research Institute Malaysia (internationally known as KEP) began in early 1900s with the humble collection made by A.M. Burn-Murdoch. Up to the Second World War, the collection continued to grow through the activities of dedicated botanists and foresters e.g., G.E.S. Cubitt, F.W. Foxworthy, J.G. Watson and C.F. Symington.

In a span of about 40 years, the KEP collection totalled about 43,000 specimens. These collection formed the basis of important publications on the timber trees of Malaya e.g., Burn-Murdoch’s “Trees and Timbers of the Malay Peninsula”, Foxworthy’s “The Commercial Woods of the Malay Peninsula” and “Dipterocarpaceae of the Malay Peninsula”, Watson’s “Mangrove Forests of the Malay Peninsula”, and Symington’s “Foresters’ Manual of Dipterocarps”.

After the Second World War, the herbarium came under the charge of J. Wyatt-Smith competently assisted by K.M. Kochummen. During this period, herbarium collection and research activity were focused on the tree families to be included in the production of a series of Manuals of Malayan Timber Trees, culminating in the publication of “Pocket Check List of Timber Trees” and “Manual of Malayan Silviculture for Inland Forest”. By 1965, the collection numbered 74,694 specimens.

T.C. Whitmore was engaged under Colombo Plan Aid between 1965 and 1972 to organise and produce a “Tree Flora of Malaya”. During this period, collection activities were greatly intensified to augment the existing collection for the project. This project took about 24 years to complete, resulting in the publication of four volumes of the Tree Flora of Malaya. The four volumes, containing accounts of 2,830 tree species in 99 families, have become the standard reference books for trees in Peninsular Malaysia.

Function Of Herbarium

The general mandate of the herbarium has been to document the woody flora of Peninsular Malaysia but recently, with the designation of KEP as the National Herbarium of Malaysia, the mandate has considerably widened to include research collection and preservation of all vascular plants of Malaysia, including bamboos and rattans as well as palms, gingers, and other herbaceous families (e.g. Gesneriaceae), orchids, climbers, ferns and lycophytes.

As a National Herbarium, the Kepong Herbarium is destined to provide the following functions:

  • as a centre of reference and research of vascular plants;
  • to conduct basic botanical research and to make available research findings through publications (e.g. floras, tree floras, checklists etc.);
  • to provide facilities for the study of related sciences, such as, ecology, silviculture and environmental assessment;
  • to provide data and information for forestry management, planning and conservation; and
  • education, especially in tree identification courses.

Current Collection & Management

Today, the Kepong Herbarium has over 300,000 specimens arranged following the modern Linear Sequence of Angiosperm Phylogeny Grouping (LAPG II), and is managed through the use of BRAHMS (Botanical Research And Herbarium Management System) software.

Any further information please contact:

Dr. Richard Chung Cheng Kong Tel: 03-62797231 Email: richard[at]frim[dot]gov[dot]my

Historical Background

Insect Reference Collection Center Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM) has started as early as 1932 when FG Browne was appointed as the first entomologist in FRIM. Since then, emphasis was given in developing collection of insects considered to be wood destroying insects or pest of forest trees valued for their timber. Most of the collection are from the beetles of the family Scolytidae dan Platypodidae many of which were ambrosia beetles.

The collections survived the Second World War but little development of the collection took place during the time. Unfortunately after independence, most of the collection including Browne’s type specimens were taken to Africa and eventually deposited at British Museum of Natural History, now known as the Natural History Museum, London.

KD Menon has continued to work on the development of specimens after Browne. He has continue to work on wood borers as well as a range of other insects. He is responsible for building up a reference collection for other insects groups mainly consisted of native species which remains in Insect Reference Collection Center FRIM until now. Tho Yow Pong who later joined the institute is responsible for the development of a very large collection of termites and moth as well as specimens of other insect groups. The specimens continue to grow through various expeditions and international collaborative projects from Japan, United Kingdom, Germany, Australia and United States of America. Approximately 20 collaboration projects withlocal and international agencies has been conducted so far and insects collected has been stored and curated by Insect Reference Collection Center FRIM. Specimens from various expedition such as ekspedisi Hutan Simpan Kota Damansara (2011), ekspedisi Hutan Simpan Panti (2008-2010), Ekspedisi Endau Rompin (1992) are also curated here.

Insect Reference Collection Center FRIM is a well known reference center for taxonomists and scientists in South East Asia as it holds approximately 600,000 insects of which 10,000 has been identified to species. It also holds approximately 229 holotype* and almost 1,000 paratype** for new species collected in Malaysia and neighbouring countries. Number of publications has been produced based on the collection of specimens stored at Insect Reference Collection Center FRIM has exceeds 200 publication including thesis, book, journal, scientific papers and technical and also online.

* ** Holotype and paratype refers to a specimen that was examined and studied by the original describer who named the particular species. The specimen is important in taxonomic work.

Function of Insect Reference Collection

Main function of the Insect Reference Collection is as follows:

  • as a centre of reference and research of insects;
  • to conduct basic botanical research and to make available research findings through publications (e.g. floras, tree floras, checklists etc.);
  • to provide facilities for the study of related sciences, such as, ecology, silviculture and environmental assessment;
  • to provide data and information for forestry management, planning and conservation; and
  • education, especially in tree identification courses.

Current Collection & Management

The collection is housed in high quality glass top wooden drawers and preserved in a well-maintained air-conditioned room with low humidity to prevent pest damage such as book lice and mite, and fungal infection. Periodical maintenance of the collection and collection room is made by Entomology staff. A digital record of the specimens is currently being developed.

Conservation system for the insect collection is by using drawers with insect storage cabinets which been maintained systematically and periodically. Insect Reference Collection Center humidy is fixed to an optimum temperature and ralative humidity to ensure the specimens will not damaged due to other insects attacts such as hama and fungal infection.

Any further information please contact:

Ong Su Ping
Tel: 03-6279 7111/ 7717
E-mail: ongsuping[at]frim.gov.my

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